08 March 2011

Nondalton

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Nondalton (non-DOLL-tun) is located on the west shore of Six Mile Lake, between Lake Clark and Iliamna Lake. Nondalton is a Tanaina Indian name first recorded in 1909 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The village was originally located on the north shore of Six Mile Lake, but in 1940 growing mudflats and wood depletion in the surrounding area caused the village to move to its present location on the west shore. It is a Tanaina Indian (Athabascan and Iliamna) village with residents following a fishing and subsistence lifestyle.

 

Information sourced from the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs Community Information Series.

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Newhalen

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Newhalen (NOO-hale-en) is located on the north shore of Iliamna Lake, at the mouth of Newhalen River. The 1890 census data listed the Eskimo village of "Noghelingamiut," meaning "people of Noghelin," at this location, with 16 residents. The present name is an Anglicized version of the original. The village was established in the late 1800s due to the bountiful fish and game in the immediate area. Newhalen incorporated as a city in 1971.
Newhalen includes Yup'ik Eskimos, Alutiiqs and Athabascans. Most practice a subsistence and fishing lifestyle. Newhalen and Iliamna share a post office and school.

 

Information sourced from the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs Community Information Series.

 

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Pedro Bay

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Pedro Bay (P-droh) is located on the Alaska Peninsula, at the head of Pedro Bay and the east end of Iliamna Lake. Historically, the Dena'ina Indians have occupied this area. The Dena'ina warred with Russian fur traders over trade practices in the early 1800s. The community was named for a man known as "Old Pedro," who lived in this area in the early 1900s. A post office was established in the village in 1936.

Information sourced from the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs Community Information Series.

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Igiugig

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Igiugig (ig-ee-UH-gig) is located on the Alaska Peninsula on the south shore of the Kvichak River, which flows from Iliamna Lake. Kiatagmuit Eskimos originally lived on the north bank of the Kvichak River in the village of Kaskanak and used Igiugig as a summer fish camp. At the turn of the century, the inhabitants moved upriver to the present site of Igiugig. People from Branch also moved to Igiugig as it began to develop. Today, about one-third of residents can trace their roots back to the Branch River village. A post office was established in 1934 but was discontinued in 1954. Commercial and subsistence fishing sustain the community.
Historically an Eskimo village, the population is now primarily Alutiiq and residents depend upon commercial fishing and a subsistence lifestyle. Sport fishing attracts visitors during summer months.

Information sourced from the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs Community Information Series.

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Naknek

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Naknek

(NACK-neck)

Naknek is located on the north bank of the Naknek River, at the northeastern end of Bristol Bay. This region was first settled more than 6,000 years ago by Yup'ik Eskimos and Athabascan Indians. In 1821, the original Eskimo village of "Naugeik" was noted by Capt. Lt. Vasiliev. By 1880, the village was called Kinuyak. Naknek has a seasonal economy as a service center for the large red salmon fishery in Bristol Bay. In 2009, 105 residents held commercial fishing permits, and several thousand people typically flood the area during the fishing season. Millions of pounds of salmon are trucked over the Naknek to King Salmon Road each summer, where jets transport the fish to the Lower 48.

 

Information sourced from the Alaska Division of Community and Regional Affairs Community Information Series.

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